Published Articles

The Correlation between Poverty and Illiteracy

The Correlation between Poverty and Illiteracy

There is a direct correlation between poverty and illiteracy. Per the Literacy Project Foundation, three out of four people on welfare cannot read. Fifty percent of unemployed individuals between 16 and 21 years of age are not considered literate. On the flip side, as the literacy rate doubles, so doubles the per capita income. Click to read more.

Strategies for Differentiating Instruction

Strategies for Differentiating Instruction

I saw a social media discussion in which former teachers shared their reasons for leaving the teaching profession. One teacher mentioned that having to create lesson plans and differentiate for each of her 20 students was too much work and too high of an expectation, given the resources available to her. Click to read more.

Getting Ready for a New School Year

Getting Ready for a New School Year

As summer comes to a close, it is time again to prepare for the exciting opportunity to teach a new class of students, or welcome back the students you worked with last year. The end of summer is an opportune time to begin gearing up for the new school year to make the most meaningful impact on your students with special needs. Click to read more.

Helping Your Child Transition into a New School Year

Helping Your Child Transition into a New School Year

As our children put the past school year behind them during summer break, there might be many changes on the horizon that can be a source of anxiety for them.  A new teacher? New building? New classmates? New routines? These changes can be overwhelming for all kids, but especially for those who need additional guidance in establishing routines and developing new relationships. Click to read more.

Applying Service Design in Competency-Based Curriculum Development

Applying Service Design in Competency-Based Curriculum Development

Higher education institutions are adopting competency‐based education (CBE) models because they want to become more learner‐centered and improve outcomes for graduates (Nodine, 2016). CBE is inherently learner‐centered because it “enables personalized learning to provide flexibility and supports to ensure mastery of the highest standards possible. Click to read more.

Planning for Post-School Outcomes

Planning for Post-School Outcomes

As educators, we don’t stop caring about students once they graduate and legally become adults; we want to make a lasting impact and empower students to achieve their goals even after they leave the K–12 system. How can we most effectively prepare our students with disabilities to face the challenges of life after K–12 schooling so that they can have a rewarding and successful adult life experience? Click to read more.

Transition Planning for Students with IEPs

Transition Planning for Students with IEPs

Transition planning is a required part of the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) that helps students with learning disabilities prepare for what they will do after high school. Transition planning begins with the IEP team meeting, during which the student’s vocational interests are explored and transition goals are put in place. Click to read more.

Ridding Mindlessness Through Mindlessness

Ridding Mindlessness Through Mindlessness

What we call stress, anxiety, unhappiness, and exhaustion are not problems in life. They are symptoms of life. They are found in the way we treat one another, how we treat ourselves, and how we treat life. Unfortunately, many of these symptoms are prevalent in today’s schools for both students and teachers.  How in the world did we get to this point? Click to read more.

Boosting the Potential of Professional Development

Boosting the Potential of Professional Development

Principals often have the final say in what types of professional learning school staff receive and which teachers get to attend professional development (PD) events off campus. We know some forms of professional learning opportunities, such as coaching, peer observation, or book studies, are crucial elements of a continuous improvement plan. Click to read more.

Building an Effective Parent-Teacher Team

Building an Effective Parent-Teacher Team

Parents and caregivers play a crucial role in the educational experience of their child—they know their history, likes and dislikes, experiences and how their child communicates. As the child enters the education system, it is important for teachers to engage with and include parents in all aspects of their child’s education, not just because it’s required but because it is what’s best for the student and team. Click to read more.